Friday, September 22, 2017

The Miracle of 12V Relays

Do you want to wire your car so that the Accessory circuit stays on until you open the door after you have turned off the ignition, like many modern cars? Built your own remote start system? Control headlights with a latching relay?

This page at The 12 Volt explains how to do that with standard 5-pin 12-volt relays. The entire site is dedicated to similar "tricks of the trade".

At Hotrodders.com, this page provides an overview of automotive uses of relays. This page also offers links to other useful pages, including headlight relays, assorted car wiring diagrams, auto wiring basics and a fix for power windows that use those stupid "wiring eliminators" in the door jambs.

Here, mechanical latching relays are explained.

GM-style power window switches are Dorman 901-018 or 49243 and the special pigtail is ACDelco PT185. A wiring diagram is found here.

A 12-volt latching relay is here.

Neutral Safety switch operation, wiring and installation information.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

O-Ringing the Block and Heads for Higher Compression Engines HOWTO

I found some useful advice in this forum thread from user AK's REX.

"To my understanding o-ringing the block or the head prove to be about equally effective. That said I would say it depends if you want to have receiver grooves machined. The most conventional method is to machine and o-ring the block, then machine receiver grooves opposite the o-rings in the heads. I guess it can probably be done in reverse fashion as well.
As far as the receiver grooves are concerned, it not only helps in high compression and or boosted applications, but helps wet motors from losing fluid which is a common problem with copper head gaskets. It allows the o-ring to literally push the gasket into the receiver groove to provide a better seal. Speaking of copper gaskets here is a bit of info from SCE regarding this stuff;
O-ring grooves may be cut in either the block or cylinder head. When using copper head gaskets thinner than .050, O-ring height should be no more than 25% of gasket thickness. For instance, the proper dimensions for an .043 thick gasket using .041 wire would be; a .038 to .040 groove width (provides a .001 interference fit), and a .032 groove depth (leaves .008-.010 of the wire protruding above the deck). This machining can be done at most high performance machine shops.

When receiver grooves are necessary, alignment of O-ring and receiver groove is critical, as is the depth and width of the receiver groove. Generally receiver groove depth should be 75% of the O-ring protrusion and the receiver groove should be 1.5 times the wire width. Example: If the O-ring is .041 wide and .015 above the deck; receiver groove should be .012 deep and .060 wide.

While the machining of O-ring and receiver grooves must be done by a machinist, the installation of the O-ring wire can be done by anyone, using common hand tools. When tapping O-ring wire into the groove, use care to avoid denting the wire. SCE provides an O-ring installation kit, (SCE PART #31542) which includes instructions, an installation tool and O-ring wire. When cutting stainless O-ring wire, file the ends square to provide the tightest possible seal."

Source: NASIOC Forums

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

A Heat Insulation Spray-on Coating Alternative to Lizard Skin.

One of the well-known spray-on heat-shield products is Lizard Skin. From their website, “LizardSkin Ceramic Insulation (CI) is an advanced spray on thermal coating that consists of a water-based composition of high-grade acrylic binders with ceramic insulation particles to create a thermal barrier.” The material Safety Data Sheet can be found at

This sheet shows the composition of Lizard Skin as:

1 - Water 7732-18-5 40-50%
2 - Resin Polymer 00-00-00 20-30%
3 - Trade Secret Insulation Media 10-20%
4 - Carbon Black 1333-86-4 5-10%
5 - Extender Pigment 1317-65-3 1-5%

It’s relatively expensive at $200 for two gallons. They sell a special gun ($120) to spray it on although it can be applied with a brush or roller.

Substitutes
It's possible to make your won for much less cost.

1,2 – high solids white latex ceiling paint
3 – Glass microspheres https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_microsphere
One suppler is HyTechSales.com, mixing at the rate of one quart of spheres per gallon of paint.
4 – This is added to give lizard skin its distinctive purple/black color. Any color is OK.

5 – Calcium carbonate, pulverized dolmitic limestone, adds bulk and texture, sourced at Amazon or hardware stores.

To spray, rent an airless paint sprayer, use the largest tip available and remove the filters screens from both the suction tube and inside the handle. The application thickness should be that of a credit card.

For heat and noise control, apply the spray-on coating, then add squares of DynaMat or similar product. It's not necessary to cover te entire panel ion DynaMat.

SOURCES

Long forum discussion of various substitutes and application details.

http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/alternative-lizard-skin-103610.html

http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/lizard-skin-application-questions-134551.html

http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/wiki/Ceramic_insulation

http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/anyone-used-lizard-skin-77796.html

http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/kizard-skin-vs-dynamat-235881.html

Sunday, February 5, 2017

A more efficient fan shroud


Volvo has developed and patented this idea for their over the road trucks, but there's no reason it can't work on smaller vehicles. The ring surrounding the fan is fixed to the engine block so the ring can be much closer to the fan blades and so i more efficient. Not obvious from the diagram is that the fan shroud is a flexible material, sealed to the radiator and the ring.

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Preventing Over-heating and Corrosion In Your Car

For hotrod, sports cars and older cars, especially cars that are infrequently driven, overheating and corrosion are all too common problems.

Many people are surprised to learn that the traditional 50/50 mix of water and anti-freeze is not the most efficient way to cool your engines. Water alone is the most efficient medium, but there are two problems associated with water as the only coolant. First, water will freeze in the winter and usually cracks the engine block. Second, antifreeze includes corrosion inhibitors and water pump lubricant, both necessary for you cooling system.

Here's how to get around those problems.

  • Replace your drain petcock with a sacrificial zinc anode or have an appropriate-sized bung added to your radiator. These anodes are commonly used in marine engines and - surprise - the hot water heater in you house uses one. It's proven technology and you can buy them at boating supply stores or Amazon.
  • Add a surfactant like Water Wetter, available at auto parts stores. This product reduces the surface tension of the coolant keeping bubbles from forming, increasing coolant to metal contact and improving the transfer of heat to the coolant.
  • To replace the corrosion inhibitors and water pump coolant, just add a bottle of  the very same thing, also found at auto parts stores.
In the spring, drain the coolant from the system, add the above ingredients to refill your radiator and top off with distilled water (never tap water - too many minerals and electrolytes that will cause scale and corrosion). Most importantly, write down how much water you use to fill the radiator because when cold weather is upon us in the fall, drain one-half of the water and replace with anti-freeze whether you will be driving your car in the cold or not.

Every Spring: Lather. Rise. Repeat.

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Tools made by Danaher/Apex are sold as:

Here for easy reference.

Tools made by Danaher/Apex are sold as Armstrong, Craftsman, Masterforce, USA Crescent, USA Kd Tools, Kobalt, and a few others.

Snap On also makes tools for Williams or CAT... maybe a few others. williams makes tools for others.

J.H. Williams and Lowes originally partnered to manufacture Kobalt tools, but since 2003, Kobalt tools have been made by Danaher. Chervon makes Kobalt’s cordless power tools
Here's a good look at who owns who which leads to who makes what.  
Who Owns Who

This site uses the tools barcode to identify the manufacturer.

A good thread that identifies "tool truck" equivalents.

Monday, August 29, 2016